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Friday, March 9, 2012

Steaming Up Your Love Scenes by Emma Holly

You want to write a steaming love scene your reader will gobble right up, and pant for more, but maybe you can't quite figure out how to start.~

Well,  Bestselling author Emma Holly is here to help make it sizzle with her e-book Steaming Up Your Love Scenes~

In Steaming Up Your Love Scenes Emma covers it all.. From overcoming inhabitions and worries over how some judge the more carnal moments; to building anticipation and adding those little details that make the reader as though they are there, then finishing it with a bang~

 Ms Holly has compiled some simple tips and tricks to get you going. She also includes some great excerpts from some of her books to show you exactly what she means. I know one thing is for sure... I will definitely be buying her nauti little novella, The Countess's Pleasure, included in the anthology Hot Spell. Thank you Emma for that excerpt! And if that lovely little excerpt is any indication of what is to come in the full length novel, The Assasins Lover ~I will be devouring it just as greedily!

Come visit Holly at   http://www.emmaholly.com
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Excerpt:
In this guide, I hope to tell you something you haven’t heard before. I’m not focused on sexual tension - though that’s important. Instead, I’m zeroing in on full-fledged love scenes, where you take your hero and heroine (or your hero and hero, or your tigress and vampire ... you get the idea) from the first whimper of arousal to the final sighs of satiation.

The first thing you need to know in order to get your steam on is how to overcome your inhibitions. The second is what makes good love scenes work. The answer to both those questions is highly individual. Once I’ve addressed them to the best of my ability, I’ll break down one of my own sex scenes so you can observe the strategies in action. I can’t pretend I’m final word on these topics. I speak only from my experience and taste. Since that’s the case, please do what all savvy writers ought when presented with a would-be teacher: use what seems good to you and ignore the rest.